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Friday, April 17, 2015

Review: The Wavering Werewolf by David Lubar

The Wavering Werewolf by David Lubar. A Monsterific Tale.

The Wavering Werewolf by David Lubar

Starscape
Publication Date: January 2014
List Price: $15.99
ISBN-13: 9780765330796

Review: When Norman goes on a fieldtrip to Miller Forest, he seems to get lost thinking about different sorts of fungi. Then he hears a half-growl, half-snarl sound. This is where The Wavering Werewolf by David Lubar becomes a real page-turner!

"Yeeyouch" It nipped my nose. Then it leaped away from me.Ó After Norman is bitten by a wolf from the forest, some strange things start happening---Better vision without his glasses, itchy skin, and he becomes more athletic. Norman starts to wonder about these changes and concludes his search with the keyword, werewolf. After a long time of convincing arguments, Norman manages to get his friend Sebastian to believe in this too. With his friend at his side, will Norman ever become human again? Will Norman be able to do this before the full moon? These are all great questions with astonishing answers only found in The Wavering Werewolf!

I would easily give this book a five star (out of five) rating! The Wavering Werewolf manages to keep me on the edge of my seat with its hilarious and amusing content! "He was encroaching my territory. I had to defend it. My hand curled into a claw. I hauled back and slashed across at the head of the invader." I think The Wavering Werewolf would be more appealing to people with interests in werewolves, action, and comedy. For people with those interests, I highly recommend The Wavering Werewolf by David Lubar. Once again, I would give this book five stars.

Review written by Diana (6th grade student).

We would like to thank Starscape/TOR for Teens for providing a copy of The Wavering Werewolf for this review.

Have you read The Wavering Werewolf? How would you rate it?

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Review: Dirty Rotten Pirates: A Revolting Guide to Pirates and Their World by Moira Butterfield

Dirty Rotten Pirates: A Revolting Guide to Pirates and Their World by Moira Butterfield.

Dirty Rotten Pirates: A Revolting Guide to Pirates and Their World by Moira Butterfield

Ticktock Publishing
Publication Date: August 2014
List Price: $8.99
ISBN-13: 9781783250486

Review: Do you like pirates? Do you want to learn more about them? Well, in Dirty Rotten Pirates by Moira Butterfield, you learn everything from typical pirates to the pirates you might not have thought existed. Buccaneers to Privateers, these pirates don't joke around; either do your job correctly or your life is in danger. This non-fiction book is phenomenal and has you staying up all night just to finish.

In Dirty Rotten Pirates there are pirates from Asia to Europe, and they raided and captured each other. Life was dirty and rotten for the average pirate. Barely a few pirates actually got rich and have a life of wealth. Rules were strict and either you followed them or received punishment. Punishment was brutal, being marooned, shot or worse. There weren't just one type of pirate; there were the proper pirates. But there are more. For example, there are many pirates from Asia, and also Vikings are also pirates. Pirates vary, as there are buccaneers- the typical pirates, and privateers- licensed pirates. A job of a pirate was very dangerous and could endanger the worker. For example, the Gun Master that is, the person who shoots and loads the cannons, had very dangerous job. Being injured was very bad, since germs weren't known at the time, and they didn't clean the tools used to remove limbs. So if the pirate didn't die from the surgery, they probably died from infection.

Dirty Rotten Pirates was extremely interesting and kept me hooked every page throughout the book. I was very intrigued and wanted to know more and more about pirates. I learned so much; for example, I learned new famous pirates more than Black Beard. I even learned there were female pirates. This book I would recommend it to boys ages 9-12, since it's about pirates. The information in the book was very impressive and kept me reading. The artwork was very fun, goes with the information, and shows what pirates look like in an entertaining way. I was astonished at how the book showed real pirates living and working, and how descriptive it was. I learned so much about pirates just from one book. Dirty Rotten Pirates is an informational but entertaining book with great description and artwork. I hope you love it as much as I did.

Review written by John (6th grade student).

We would like to thank Ticktock for providing a copy of Dirty Rotten Pirates: A Revolting Guide to Pirates and Their World for this review.

Have you read Dirty Rotten Pirates: A Revolting Guide to Pirates and Their World? How would you rate it?

Monday, April 13, 2015

Review: A Girl's to Fitting in Fitness by Erin Whitehead & Jennipher Walters

A Girl's to Fitting in Fitness by Erin Whitehead & Jennipher Walters.

A Girl's to Fitting in Fitness by Erin Whitehead & Jennipher Walters

Zest Books
Publication Date: April 2013
List Price: $12.99
ISBN-13: 9781936976300

Review: Did you know that becoming fit will help you relieve stress? Well, if you don't believe me, read Chapter 8 in the amazing nonfiction book, A Girl's Guide to Fitting in Fitness by Erin Whitehead and Jennipher Walters. This book will help you become the healthy person you've always wanted to be while having some fun!

A Girl's Guide to Fitting in Fitness has many chapters. This first chapter, Why Getting Fit Matters, tells you the importance of why you need to get in shape. Basics of a Fitness Plan informs you on the fundamentals of your workout procedure. Eating Well mentions the things you should and shouldn't be eating while trying to become fit. You will find healthy breakfasts and morning exercise routines in chapter Waking Up to Exercise. Being Fit at School talks about joining a sports team at your school. On Weekends & During the Summer refers to how it is important to still workout and eat healthy but make the most of that free time. Next-level Fitness mentions how to become even healthier and slimmer by doing such as setting smart goals, joining a gym and doing high-intensity interval training once in a while. Stress-Busting Techniques mentions many effective methods to get rid of stress. This book includes all aspects of fitness.

In my opinion, A Girl's Guide to Fitting in Fitness is a useful source of information on getting real results. I recommend this 5-star book to girls ages 13-18 looking to get fit. My favorite chapter of this book is Stress-Busting Techniques because it definitely has an impact on my stress. I am very fond of this book because it gives me a lot of real-working techniques to get me fit and healthy. In summary, A Girl's Guide to Fitting in Fitness is unquestionably my favorite guide to working out!

Review written by Angelina (6th grade student).

We would like to thank Zest Books for providing a copy of A Girl's to Fitting in Fitness for this review.

Have you read A Girl's to Fitting in Fitness? How would you rate it?

Friday, April 10, 2015

Review: Raven in a Dove House by Andrea Davis Pinkney

Raven in a Dove House by Andrea Davis Pinkney.

Raven in a Dove House by Andrea Davis Pinkney

Houghton Mifflin Books for Children
Publication Date: April 2014
List Price: $8.99
ISBN-13: 9780544230163

Review: Imagine that you are at your aunt's house. You are watching the food, making sure it doesn't burn. Your cousin and his friend call you upstairs in the attic. When you go upstairs, they give you something very unexpected. That is just a part of the book Raven In a Dove House by Andrea Davis Pinkney.

In Raven In A Dove House, Nell was just a regular 12-year-old going to her aunt's house for the summer. She is happy that she was going to her aunt's house since she will be away from Brenda, her dad's girlfriend. Nell finally reaches her aunt's house, and after a few goodbyes, they finally went inside. Nell met her cousin, Foley, and his friend, Slade. One day, Nell was watching the food, making sure that it won't burn. Slade and Foley were in the attic counting worms. All of a sudden they both called Nell up stairs. Nell went upstairs, and Slade gave her something called a raven .25. They told her put it in her dollhouse. All of a sudden Nell doesn't trust anyone. She doesn't even trust herself! Will Nell trust anyone or herself ever again?

Andrea Davis Pinkney's writing will keep you glued to the book! You won't be able to stop turning pages because of all the events in the book. In my opinion, Raven in a Dove House is probably for ages 10 and older because in some scenes it feels like two people are flirting. There is also a weapon in the book, which probably wouldn't be appropriate for younger readers to read. The vocabulary in this book isn't complicated, although there is dialect. This book is good for both boys and girls. It would be good for a boy because most boys would like the fact that the narrative includes a weapon. There are also boy characters in the story, so there are many boy activities in the book. The book is good for girls because it is told from a girl's point of view, and there are events in the book that girls would like. I liked that this book was written in first person point of view so the narrator's feelings are explained more. Overall, Raven in a Dove House is a very good book.

Review written by Sabeen (6th grade student).

Have you read Raven in a Dove House? How would you rate it?

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Review: Love Me by Rachel Shukert

Love Me by Rachel Shukert. A Starstruck Novel.

Love Me by Rachel Shukert

Delacorte Press Books for Young Readers
Publication Date: February 2014
List Price: $17.99
ISBN-13: 9780385741101

Review: Amanda Farraday is broken! She just broke up with the famous writer, Harry Gordon. Amanda tries her best to convince Harry to take her back. Meanwhile, Margo Sterling has everything anyone would dream of. She is famous, she has the looks and the one and only Dane Forrest, but believe it or not, Margo's personal life just might end her career. Gabby Preston's life isn't going so well either. She's not so healthy with alcohol and pills, and her relationship with bad-boy Eddie Sharp is just starting to take off. The book Love Me by Rachel Shukert is the sequel to Starstruck.

In Love Me, each character's problems get even worse than they were originally. Amanda continues to try to convince Harry to take her back, but he isn't interested. Margo has some problems with Dane that she has to work out. Gabby cannot control her drinking, and it's not so easy when you're dating a bad boy like Eddie Sharp. The lives of each character are organized in separate chapters, one chapter it might be about Amanda, the next it might be focused on Margo.

Readers will not be able to stop reading due to the outstanding writing of Rachel Shukert. I encourage everyone to read this book because the climax and other elements of the story keep you attached to the book. I think girls would like this book because they might be able to relate to the storyline more than boys. I really liked this book because each girl approaches her problems differently. This book had a very satisfying ending and I'm sure most readers would agree. The author is so descriptive with her writing; it makes you feel as if you are in the story. This is the best book I have ever read by far. I would recommend it to anyone who likes realistic fiction because overall it is a great book, and I loved it. Readers who are looking to dive into a good book just found one. Love Me by Rachel Shukert is one of the most interesting books I have ever read.

Review written by Rija (6th grade student).

We would like to thank Random House for providing a copy of Love Me for this review.

Have you read Love Me? How would you rate it?

Monday, April 6, 2015

Review: Krabat and the Sorcerer's Mill by Otfried Preussler

Krabat and the Sorcerer's Mill by Otfried Preussler. A Reprint of the Classic Novel.

Krabat and the Sorcerer's Mill by Otfried Preussler

The New York Review Children's Collection
Publication Date: September 2014
List Price: $17.95
ISBN-13: 9781590177785

Review: Ker-chunk! Ker-chunk! The mill goes on. Have you ever been turned into a raven at the blink of eye? Imagine being trapped in a creepy mill with a malevolent and mysterious owner. In the book, Krabat And The Sorcerer's Mill, the main character, Krabat, was created with careful consideration by the author of this wild adventure, Otfried Preussler. He used creative ways to bring this book to life, and make the readers lose their wits in this grand story.

Krabat And The Sorcerer's Mill has many twists and turns in the entire entrancing book. Krabat reaches a village called Schwarszkollm with two of his companions. For the past few nights, Krabat hears mysterious voices in his dream and hesitates on what will be the wisest decision to make about these strange voices. Should he tell his companions? He finally decides to follow the voices and he gets swayed around to an old mill that none of the villagers dare to go by. Knocking on the door of the mill, he thinks the mill is abandoned. So he decides to slip into the dark mill. He sees a light in a room, far back in the mill. The only source of light is a single candle. The candle is sitting inside a human skull, with a book on the bottom. With the little candlelight, Krabat sees a man with an eye patch muttering strange words in gibberish. Krabat tries to rush out of the mill, but before he has the chance, a cold and firm hand lays on his shoulder. The man with he eye patch is staring right at him! Before he knows it, Krabat is working at this mill with eleven journeymen accompanying him. They work the mill ground and repair the mill. For the first few weeks, Krabat feels safe, and thinks the apprenticeship is a great opportunity. He finally realizes that this is no ordinary mill and something wrong is happening when he is introduced to black magic by the master, the person with the eye patch. He also finds out that every year one miller dies and another one comes. What will happen to Krabat? Will Krabat die next?

I think Krabat And The Sorcerer's Mill is a very interesting fictional book about magic, trickery, mystery, humor, and romance. I loved the twists when you think something happened, but it isn't what it appears to be. For example, one of the journeymen tries to kill himself, but it didn't turn out how he interpreted. I loved how the author tries to use older time language to capture you in the book with dialect from the journeymen. The author uses some words, like hastily and linger, that might be hard for some sixth graders, but if you're advanced in reading, this is perfect for you. In my opinion, this book would be appropriate for either boys or girls because it has elements that would appeal to both genders. Girls might like the story line about the romance between Krabat and his secret lover. On the other hand, boys are usually more interested in the adventure and excitement of this book. I seriously couldn't put the book down. While reading this book, I found it almost impossible to resist knowing the end. The book features many mysteries. On countless occasions I would try guessing what was on the next page of the book. The wittiness of the book is also extraordinary. I especially liked Krabat's dreams about the eleven crows and what they symbolized. In conclusion, this book is perfect for almost any sixth grader, and can be associated with many genres that make it suitable for almost anyone. Krabat And The Sorcerer's Mill totally exceeded my expectations and I give it a ten out of ten.

Review written by Pavel (6th grade student).

We would like to thank The New York Review Children's Collection for providing a copy of Krabat and the Sorcerer's Mill for this review.

Have you read Krabat and the Sorcerer's Mill? How would you rate it?

Friday, April 3, 2015

Review: Divided by Elsie Chapman

Divided by Elsie Chapman. The Sequel to Dualed.

Divided by Elsie Chapman

Random House Books for Young Readers
Publication Date: May 2014
List Price: $17.99
ISBN-13: 9780449812952

Review: In Elsie Chapman's Divided, West Grayer has finished killing people. The board just wants her to kill only one more person. She has won against her alternate, a twin who wasn't raised or lived with her. West now wants to go on with her life, after showing how she has a good chance of having promising future in front of her.

In the story, the board is making West a deal so that they can convince her to kill only one more time. The deal that they are making is too good to pass. The deal is worth killing someone. When West is on her mission to kill the person they want her to kill, she realizes that she is way too focused on the deal the people in the board made with her. She recognizes the person she is supposed to kill is a ghost from when she was younger, long ago. When West finally realizes that the board was actually lying to her about everything all along, she decides that she must not complete her current mission, to kill the ghost from when she was younger. Instead, she must replace it with a new mission. Her new mission is to find out the truth about her past, so that she can make sure that she will have a good, bright future ahead. Will West do whatever it takes to save her loved ones and her future? Will the board do whatever it takes to keep West from finding out the truth behind their big lie?

Elsie Chapman has taken suspense, thrill, and action, and filled every page of Divided with them. She left me with many cliffhangers throughout the book. I really like this book, because of how suspenseful the plot is. I often found myself at the edge of my seat, while reading Divided. I recommend this book to 5th graders and up, because the plot may be a bit complicated or confusing for younger kids. Also, this book will appeal to readers that are really into thrillers and suspense. Overall, Divided was a really good book, with a really great story.

Review written by Amanda (6th grade student).

We would like to thank Random House for providing a copy of Divided for this review.

Have you read Divided? How would you rate it?